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New Jersey Statutes, Title: 39, MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC REGULATION

    Chapter 4: Application of chapter

      Section: 39:4-144: Stopping or yielding right of way before entering stop or yield intersections.

          
39:4-144. No driver of a vehicle or street car shall enter upon or cross an intersecting street marked with a "stop" sign unless:

a. The driver has first brought the vehicle or street car to a complete stop at a point within five feet of the nearest crosswalk or stop line marked upon the pavement at the near side of the intersecting street and shall proceed only after yielding the right of way to all vehicular traffic on the intersecting street which is so close as to constitute an immediate hazard.

b. No driver of a vehicle or street car shall enter upon or cross an intersecting street marked with a "yield right of way" sign without first slowing to a reasonable speed for existing conditions and visibility, stopping if necessary, and the driver shall yield the right of way to all vehicular traffic on the intersecting street which is so close as to constitute an immediate hazard; unless, in either case, the driver is otherwise directed to proceed by a traffic or police officer or traffic control signal.

c. No driver of a vehicle or street car shall turn right at an intersecting street marked with a "stop" sign or "yield right of way" sign unless the driver stops and remains stopped for pedestrians crossing the roadway within a marked crosswalk, or at an unmarked crosswalk, into which the driver is turning.

amended 1956, c.107, s.5; 1958, c.114, s.4; 2008, c.9, s.1; 2009, c.319, s.4.



This section added to the Rutgers Database: 2012-09-26 13:37:51.






Older versions of 39:4-144 (if available):



Court decisions that cite this statute: CLICK HERE.

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