Centenial Celebration

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Date: November 29, 2020 Sun

Time: 3:12 am

Results for victims of domestic violence, services for

5 results found

Author: Williamson, Emma

Title: Pilot Project: Domestic Abuse and Military Families

Summary: This pilot project will seek to ascertain, via a focus group and on-line survey, i) the nature and extent of abuse experienced by military families, ii) service use, and iii) service needs of both perpetrators and victims of abuse in this context. During this developmental (pilot) phase we will be seeking to establish baseline data which identifies service need and potential interventions. The families of service personnel and the personnel themselves will benefit if we are able to identify triggers to abusive behaviour at home and external and internal interventions which may reduce the likelihood of domestic abuse occurring in these families. This research project examines the: 1) Nature and extent of domestic violence within military families; 2) Impact of this abuse and identify potential interventions; 3) Kind of services families may, or may have tried, to access in the past; 4) Ways in which service personnel explain the reasons for their abusive behaviour and whether specialist interventions might be developed to assist them.

Details: Bristol, UK: University of Bristol, 2009. 21p.

Source: Internet Resource: Accessed October 14, 2010 at: http://www.bris.ac.uk/sps/research/projects/completed/2009/rk7020/finalreport.pdf

Year: 2009

Country: United Kingdom

URL: http://www.bris.ac.uk/sps/research/projects/completed/2009/rk7020/finalreport.pdf

Shelf Number: 119958

Keywords:
Domestic Violence
Family Violence
Military
Victims of Domestic Violence, Services for
Violence Against Women

Author: Ajayi, Titilope

Title: State Responses to Women’s Security Challenges: An Assessment of Ghana’s Domestic Violence Victim Support Unit – Lessons for Nigeria

Summary: Violence against women (VAW) is violence that is committed against women because they are women. It affects an estimated 1 in every 3 women worldwide (United Nations, 2006), depriving them of ‘their ability to achieve their full potential by threatening their safety, freedom and autonomy’. VAW has important health, social, and economic consequences for survivors, their families, and the communities and countries where they live (World Health Organisation, 2009). In the face of high levels of VAW and sexual victimization in Nigeria, much of it perpetrated with impunity by security officials, the blatant dearth of state-sponsored support services has contributed to low levels of reporting and unequal access to justice. Civil society has advocated actively against this and provided support in the form of counselling, shelters, hotlines, training and other activities intended to enhance police capacity to handle VAW. The impact that has been made, such as the creation of a gender violence desk in the Ilupeju police station in Lagos, Nigeria, is limited due to a lack of resources and inadequate government support. For this reason, there is a need for more targeted and coordinated interventions within the framework of national level policy support that would be best provided by a national domestic violence (DV) bill that has been pending since 2003. Gender desks exist in some police stations in Nigeria. Yet uneven knowledge of their status and mandate, even among police personnel, calls into question their effectiveness and relevance. This disparity, juxtaposed with UNIFEM’s praise for the desks as a useful tool for addressing VAW, indicates that the issue needs to be revisited and leads this paper to recommend the reorientation and reintroduction, as appropriate, of VAW units within the Nigeria Police Force (NPF) and set out guidelines for this project. Women’s police stations and units created within police stations to handle VAW are relatively recent and increasingly popular international phenomena recommended by the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) as appropriate and effective tools for combating VAW. In Africa, these units currently exist in Namibia (1993), South Africa (1995), Sierra Leone (2001), Lesotho (2003), Liberia (2005), and Tanzania (2008) with mandates to eradicate gender based violence (GBV), including against children, regardless of where it occurs. Established in 1998, the Domestic Violence Victim Support Unit (DOVVSU) of the Ghana Police Service (GPS) is one of a few in Africa set up exclusively to handle cases of VAW. Although it is not perfect and this approach is not necessarily a one-size-fits-all solution to the scourge of VAW, there are important lessons to be learned from DOVVSU’s experiences. In light of prevailing high rates of VAW in Nigeria, and as a complement to ongoing police reform efforts there, there is a strong case for establishing a similar unit within the NPF. This report distils these lessons in an effort to assist the NPF in tackling Nigerian women’s security challenges in a more coherent and lasting manner. Section two discusses some common ‘causes’ of VAW while section three outlines the general context of security in the countries under study. Sections four and five examine state and non-state responses to VAW in both countries with a focus on what has driven and sustained the DOVVSU in Ghana. A final section sets out guidelines for improving the NPF’s response to VAW based on lessons from Ghana.

Details: Santiago de Chile: The Global Consortium on Security Transformation (GCST), 2011. 27p.

Source: Internet Resource: New Voices Series, No. 11: Accessed April 4, 2011 at: http://www.securitytransformation.org/images/publicaciones/200_New_Voices_Series_11_-_State_Responses_to_Womens_Security_Challenges.pdf

Year: 2011

Country: Africa

URL: http://www.securitytransformation.org/images/publicaciones/200_New_Voices_Series_11_-_State_Responses_to_Womens_Security_Challenges.pdf

Shelf Number: 121240

Keywords:
Domestic Violence (Africa)
Intimate Partner Violence
Police and Domestic Violence
Rape
Sexual Assault
Victims of Domestic Violence, Services for
Violence Against Women

Author: Dolev & Associates

Title: No Boundaries: The Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project: Final Research Report

Summary: In 2006, the Scottish Government (then Scottish Executive) established the Multiple and Complex Needs Initiative with the aim of improving public services for people with multiple and complex needs. One of the objectives of the initiative was to understand the processes by which people with multiple and complex needs engage with services to resolve their problems, and to determine how service providers might better facilitate this process. With this objective in mind the Social Inclusion Division (formerly Social Inclusion and Voluntary Issues) provided funding for a series of pilot / demonstration projects in specific sectors which would work to address multiple needs. A pilot / demonstration project was established in August 2006 in Tayside by a consortium of partners from the domestic abuse and substance misuse sectors. The project was set-up to target women experiencing domestic abuse who also have substance misuse issues, and their children (if any). The first phase of this project consisted of a six-month research programme which aimed to validate existing anecdotal knowledge and to identify priority areas for the development of services. The project was undertaken on a Tayside wide basis, covering the three local authority areas of Perth and Kinross, Dundee City and Angus. Partners in delivery included three Domestic Abuse Forums, three Drug and Alcohol Action Teams (DAATs), and various other organisations (including Voluntary Sector organisations, Tayside police, NHS Tayside and others). The aim of the research element of the project was to identify depositional and organisational / institutional factors that positively and negatively affect the progression of women who are affected by domestic abuse and their own substance misuse at each stage of their service use (from access to outcomes), with a view to establishing: • Evidence of a link between domestic abuse and substance misuse • Incentives/barriers to accessing services • Experiences of service provision in both sectors • Experiences of partnership working between the two sectors • Links to other needs (i.e. homelessness, mental health issues). This report presents the results of a secondary analysis of data collected for the Tayside Domestic Abuse and Substance Misuse Project by a different research team. The secondary analysis was conducted by Dolev & Associates, with funding from the Scottish Government Multiple and Complex Needs Initiative. An attempt was made to identify the depositional and organisational factors which shape the experiences of women who are affected by domestic abuse and their own substance misuse at each stage of their service use from the existing data set. It is important to note, however, that this was not fully achievable due to some limitations of the data collected during the initial research project. The findings presented in this report include a review of the literature on the links between domestic abuse and substance misuse, and secondary analysis of (a) service users questionnaire; (b) Interviews with service users, and (c) Interviews with domestic abuse and substance misuse service providers.

Details: Dundee, UK: Dundee City Council, 2008. 109p.

Source: Internet Resource: Accessed April 15, 2011 at: http://lx.iriss.org.uk/sites/default/files/resources/Report%20FINAL.pdf

Year: 2008

Country: United Kingdom

URL: http://lx.iriss.org.uk/sites/default/files/resources/Report%20FINAL.pdf

Shelf Number: 117820

Keywords:
Domestic Abuse
Domestic Violence
Substance Abuse
Victims of Domestic Violence, Services for
Violence Against Women

Author: Burgess, Gemma

Title: Domestic Violence -- Assistance for Adults Without Dependent Children

Summary: Anecdotal evidence has suggested that adults who are fleeing domestic violence are often not accepted as being vulnerable and having priority need, and consequently the help they get from a local authority may be limited to advice and assistance to help them secure accommodation for themselves. Concern has been expressed that such a response may put these people at risk of having to return to a violent situation. This study aimed to gather firm evidence on the extent to which adults without dependent children who have to leave their homes as a result of domestic violence, and who seek housing assistance from a local authority, receive sufficient assistance to ensure they do not have to return to accommodation where they would be at risk of violence. The study sought to consider and provide evidence on the provision of both statutory and non-statutory assistance, provided directly by local authorities and partner providers. Where adults without dependent children do not receive a response that ensures they do not have to return to accommodation where they would be at risk of violence, this study aimed to establish why this is the case, and to identify the consequences for these adults. It gathered evidence to establish whether there are any particular groups of adults who are more likely to receive appropriate help to ensure they do not have to return to accommodation where they would be at risk of violence, and whether there are particular groups who may be at greater risk of not getting the assistance they need. The four key objectives of this study were to establish: 1. Estimates of the number and circumstances of adults who have to leave their home because of a risk of violence, who seek housing assistance from a local authority and who receive sufficient assistance to ensure they do not need to return to accommodation where they would be at risk of violence. 2. Estimates of the number and circumstances of adults who have to leave their home because of a risk of violence, who seek housing assistance from a local authority and who do not receive sufficient assistance to ensure they do not need to return to accommodation where they would be at risk of violence. 3. The types of housing assistance being provided to such adults, both statutory and non statutory. 4. Where such adults are not getting the assistance they need to ensure they do not need to return to accommodation where they are at risk of violence, what are the reasons for this, and the implications? Do they, for example, return to a violent situation, or do they make alternative arrangements?

Details: London: Department for Communities and Local Government, 2011. 153p.

Source: Internet Resource: Accessed July 18, 2011 at: http://www.cchpr.landecon.cam.ac.uk/Downloads/DV%20final%20report.pdf

Year: 2011

Country: United Kingdom

URL: http://www.cchpr.landecon.cam.ac.uk/Downloads/DV%20final%20report.pdf

Shelf Number: 122093

Keywords:
Domestic Violence (U.K.)
Family Violence
Housing
Intimate Partner Violence
Victims of Domestic Violence, Services for

Author: DePrince, Anne P.

Title: The Effectiveness of Coordinated Outreach in Intimate Partner Violence Cases: A Randomized, Longitudinal Design

Summary: Intimate partner violence (IPV) poses an extremely costly problem to the individual, society, and criminal justice system. Effective responses to IPV require comprehensive, well-coordinated policies and protocols that maximize the legal sanctions and available community resources. Prosecution decisions and criminal justice outcomes are influenced by victim support for official action. The current study tested the prediction that early coordinated victim outreach would improve criminal justice outcomes as well as increase victim safety and empowerment. In collaboration with research, criminal justice, and community-based partners, this project employed a randomized control design to evaluate an innovative outreach program for racially and ethnically diverse IPV victims whose cases have come to the attention of the criminal justice system. Participants, who were randomly selected to receive outreach or treatment-as-usual, were interviewed at three time points: after an incident of IPV was reported to the police (T1), 6 months after T1, and 12 months after T1. The study addressed three primary goals. First, we evaluated the effectiveness of a coordinated, community-based outreach program in improving criminal justice and victim safety and empowerment outcomes for IPV victims using a longitudinal, randomized control design. Second, we identified victim and case characteristics that moderated outcomes. Third, we evaluated the influence of spatial characteristics on criminal justice outcomes. Between 5 December 2007 and 14 July 2008, 236 women in Denver City/County were enrolled into the study within a median of 26 days from an incident of IPV report to law enforcement. Victim-focused outreach had an impact on decreasing women’s reluctance to work with prosecutors and increasing women’s likelihood of being encouraged to take part in the prosecution of their abusers. These findings also indicated that outreach might be particularly important for IPV survivors marginalized by race/ethnicity, socio-economic status as well as for those survivors still living with their abusers after the target IPV incident (from which they were recruited for study participation). In addition, compared to the treatment-as-usual condition, women who received outreach reported decreased PTSD symptom severity, depression, and fear one year later. Although there were no effects of outreach on revictimization or social support levels, women randomly assigned to outreach reported greater readiness to leave the abuser than women assigned to treatment-as-usual. Further, the use of a geographic information system (GIS) revealed spatial patterns to key variables, such as aggression and posttraumatic responses. Women who anticipated problems going to court due to travel-related barriers (e.g., problems parking, taking the bus, etc.) were less likely to go to court when asked to go. Thus, this research highlights potential ways to think about and use spatial data in victim-focused research. Finally, research, policy, and practice implications of the study are discussed.

Details: Final report to the U.S. National Institute of Justice, 2012. 142p.

Source: Internet Resource: Accessed May 15, 2012 at: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/238480.pdf

Year: 2012

Country: United States

URL: https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/238480.pdf

Shelf Number: 125270

Keywords:
Family Violence
Intimate Partner Violence (U.S.)
Victims of Domestic Violence, Services for
Violence Against Women