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New Jersey Statutes, Title: 26, HEALTH AND VITAL STATISTICS

    Chapter 2C:

      Section: 26:2C-8.15: Findings, declarations relative to California Low Emission Vehicle program.

          
1. The Legislature finds and declares that the implementation of the National Low Emission Vehicle program is a key component of the State's efforts to achieve on-time emissions reductions and to attain compliance with the national ambient air quality standards, as required pursuant to the federal "Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990," 42 U.S.C. s.7403 et seq.; that the State's attainment of the national ambient air quality standards will require further, more stringent reductions in emissions of pollutants; that the California Low Emission Vehicle program provides for greater reductions in pollutants than the National Low Emission Vehicle program; and that the State has committed to implementing the National Low Emission Vehicle program until 2006 but can implement the California Low Emission Vehicle program after that year.

The Legislature further finds and declares that in the summer of 2002, New Jersey had the highest number of smog violations per monitoring station in the nation; that in December 2003, the United States Environmental Protection Agency announced its intention to designate the entire State as out-of-compliance with the agency's health-based standard for ozone; and that this designation by the United States Environmental Protection Agency would require the State to adopt a stronger, more comprehensive clean air plan for the State.

The Legislature further finds and declares that a significant percentage of particulate emissions, smog-forming emissions, and airborne cancer risk comes from vehicle emissions; that pollution from automobiles is expected to increase with the projected population increase estimate of an additional 1,200,000 people in the State in the next decade; and that mobile sources of emissions have received less regulatory attention than industrial facilities and area sources of pollution.

The Legislature further finds and declares that ground-level ozone, or smog, is formed when automobile, industrial and other pollutants chemically react with bright sunshine and high temperatures; that ground-level ozone irritates the respiratory system and can cause coughing, wheezing, chest pain and headaches; that ozone especially aggravates chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and bronchitis; that ground-level ozone and other air toxics have a substantial negative impact on the health and quality of life of residents of the State; and that reducing ground-level ozone pollution will help reduce these negative health effects.

The Legislature therefore determines that it is in the public interest to: implement the California Low Emission Vehicle program beginning January 1, 2009; establish a zero emission vehicle credit bank for manufacturers; establish a Low Emission Vehicle Review Commission charged with reviewing the implementation of the program, the availability and success of the incentive, and the technology of zero emission vehicles; and provide an incentive for the purchase or lease of zero emission vehicles.

L.2003,c.266,s.1.



This section added to the Rutgers Database: 2012-09-26 13:37:48.






Older versions of 26:2C-8.15 (if available):



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